Flora Springs Featured in The Sacramento Bee

December 18, 2018

Note: The article excerpted below was originally published in The Sacramento Bee and can be found here.

Dunne on Wine: A California wine for everyone on your gift list

The Sacramento Bee Napa Valley MerlotFor every grape variety it handles, from cabernet sauvignon through malbec, Flora Springs Winery is one of the more consistently reliable producers in Napa Valley. It just never disappoints, and each year at least one of its wines ends up on my list of favorites. This year it is the Flora Springs Winery 2015 Napa Valley Merlot ($30), which all on its own could revive merlot as a staple of the American table for its vivacious fruit, startling complexity and refreshing buoyancy. There are suggestions of plums, cherries and raspberries in aroma and flavor, to be sure, but more intriguing is its thread of green olives.


Helpful Links:
2015 Napa Valley Merlot – sold out
2016 Napa Valley Merlot

Making Spirits Bright at The Room

December 2, 2018

Note: The following article was originally and published in The Mercury News and can be found here.

4 spectacular Sonoma and Napa wineries dress up for the holidays

St Helena Tasting Room

Countless wineries offer suggestions and specials on their wares to make the yuletide merry, but there are some that go way beyond the bottle to make spirits bright. These Sonoma and Napa estates and tasting rooms take bedecking and bedazzling to the next level as proof that it’s not just harvest that’s the most wonderful time of the year. Here are are four special spots to explore….

Winery namesake Flora Komes loves the holidays and each year, her grandkids and winery employees go up to her attic for decorations and inspiration. The main estate on Zinfandel Lane is always decorated, but it’s the main tasting room on Highway 29 that gets the full tree and tinsel treatment. A giant wreath and ornaments outside make the already eye-catching modern building even more noticeable. Inside, it’s wall-to-wall trees, wreaths and garlands.

They even bottle up their contagious Christmas cheer in special seasonal releases, including a cabernet called Holiday Helper, and a holiday red blend in a trio of etched bottles with artwork inspired by Flora’s Christmas card collection, such as this year’s toy soldier and snow globe of the estate. For true cabernet connoisseurs, the Three Kings vertical includes the 2014-2016 vintages for a gift that’s fit for, well, a king.


Helpful Links:
Visit The Room
Holiday Wines
2016 Holiday Helper Cabernet Sauvignon
Three Kings Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 3-Bottle Vertical

Flora Springs Featured in Wine Spectator

November 28, 2018

Note: The following article was originally written by Kim Marcus and published in the Wine Spectator on November 30, 2018 and can be found here.

Peaks & Valleys
California Merlot is at its best in Napa, where vineyards at diverse elevations deliver distinctive styles

Though Merlot is grown throughout California, Napa Valley is by far the variety’s powerhouse appellation. Yet the region’s wines are not all cut from the same cloth. There’s a marked contrast in style between wines grown on the valley floor and those sourced from mountain sites. The driving force in both types is texture, but the valley wines tend to be fleshy and richer, while higher altitudes provide more structure and purity of flavor. The two top bottlings in this report-one from a high-elevation site and one from valley vineyards—help bring those styles into focus, and their differences can be instructive when it comes to making buying decisions with this versatile grape.

In the past year, I’ve tasted 135 Merlots and Merlot-based blends, with an impressive 43 scoring an outstanding 90 points or higher on the Wine Spectator 100-point scale. (A free alphabetical guide to all wines tasted for this report is available.) The flagship mountain bottling is the La Jota Howell Mountain 2015 (93 points, $85), which offers intense and pure red fruit flavors. La Jota is in the stable of the Jackson Family group of wineries, as is another outstanding mountain Merlot, the Mt. Brave Mount Veeder 2015 (91 $80), with robust and well-knit dried berry and black fruit flavors. The wines are firmly tannic and fresh-tasting, hallmarks of the higher altitudes where they were grown—both at about 1,800 feet, though on opposite sides of the valley.

Skilled Jackson Family veteran Chris Carpenter made both La Jota and Mt. Brave. “There’s a structure to mountain Merlot that is incredibly compelling. And a lot of how I think about Bordeaux varieties in the mountains is tannin development,” he says. “How are the tannins in sync with the sugars, phenols, acid and other compounds? Ultimately, I’d like to have them all in their respective sweet spots, but they all act independently of each other.”

Tannins are usually bigger in mountain-grown grapes, which are typically smaller in size than valley fruit and have a higher skin-to-pulp ratio (skins are tannin-rich). The small berry size is mostly due to the poorer soils and cooler conditions found in the mountains. “The vines are struggling here more than on the valley floor, because there’s very little clay in the soils that retains water and [the soils] are low in nutrients,” Carpenter adds. “Tannins are protective and are there to allow the fruit to ripen.”

To help wrangle those tannins, Carpenter employs a variety of techniques. He is careful to optimally sequence the harvest down to the individual row or plot, which is complicated by the many vineyard exposures, including the shadows cast by tall mountain forests. That’s more of an issue on Mount Brave, where the slopes are steep compared to the relatively level terrain found at the top of Howell Mountain. In the cellar, Carpenter encourages modest exposure to the softening effects of oxygen through aerative pump-overs along with gentle racking into barrels.

The top representative from the valley floor this year is the Venge Oakville Oakville Estate Vineyard 2015 (93, $70), big and rich, with luscious dark fruit flavors. Grab this one while you can, because its vines were pulled for replanting after the vintage. It was made by Kirk Venge, of the family-owned estate in Calistoga, who is now hoping replicate its quality in future vintages with fruit from the nearby Kenefick Ranch vineyard, among other sources.

“I love the approachability of Merlot. The flavor profile has a softer body to it. It’s fun to see its personality and, compared to Cabernet, it shows the terroir better,” Venge says. “We’ve always stuck by Merlot and never abandoned it, even with Sideways,” he adds, referring to the 2004 hit movie in which Merlot was disparaged and that many believe led to the sizeable drop in demand for the wines in the ensuing years. “It’s wonderful in a blend and great by itself, but it is hard to grow because it is prone to poor fruit set and overcropping. It can give you some attitude.”

Venge points outs that he considers Kenefick, which features a very gentle slope at the base of the Palisades cliffs just south of the town of Calistoga, to be more a benchland site than a pure valley vineyard. It also one of the warmest areas in Napa, and Venge is careful with canopy management to protect against the strong rays of the sun. The soils here are gravelly and well-drained, traits the site shares with the vineyard that produced last year’s top-scoring Merlot, the Duckhorn Three Palms Vineyard Napa Valley 2014, which also took Wine of the Year honors.

“We do ripen earlier here but it’s a good location. It gets sun, that’s for sure, but a little later [in the day] because of the Palisades and the narrowness of the valley here,” Venge explains. A tasting of the yet-to-be-released 2016 Kenefick Ranch Merlot revealed richness to the sanguine and spice box flavors. Venge added 5 percent Petit Verdot to the cuvée to build structure and boost depth of flavor; Carpenter added 3 percent Petit Verdot and 2 percent Tannat to his 2016 La Jota for the same reason.

In the list of recommended wines that accompanies this report, you will find additional examples of both mountain and valley styles. From the mountains, besides La Jota and Mt. Brave, top wines were made by Luna, Pride and Beringer. Due to their powerful structures, most would benefit from short-term cellaring and should be good matches for roasted meats and other savory dishes. The leading Merlots of the valley style include those from Flora Springs, Darioush, Stewart and St. Francis (in Sonoma). These are fine for sipping on their own or paired with pasta or grilled steak.

On the values front, you have to be choosy. High-yielding Merlot can taste thin and herbal, and it requires committed winemaking to make high quality affordable versions. Planting it in the right terrain is key as well—with rich soils, the grapes can overproduce and turn weedy; in poorer soils, the tannins can turn tough.

“Like Cabernet does on thinner soils, Merlot can become a raisin even more quickly due to the size of the berry. Or at least head in that direction. Therefore I look for more glacial soils, loam soils, and if they have some clay, even better,” says Nick Goldschmidt, whose Goldschmidt Dry Creek Valley Chelsea Goldschmidt Salmon’s Leap 2015 (90, $20) is one the top values in this report. Other key factors for Goldschmidt include selecting rootstocks in the vineyard that can produce ripe fruit in California’s bone-dry summers without dehydrating. In the cellar, keeping quality high means long fermentations to extract as much flavor as possible.

Wine Spectator Merlot Recommendations
John Komes, president of Flora Springs, produced an outstanding and well-priced Merlot with its Napa Valley 2014, a concentrated and spice-accented version from valley floor vineyards.

 

An exceptionally priced wine for the quality is the Flora Springs Merlot Napa Valley 2014 (92, $30), with silky tannins behind the spicy red fruit flavors. Outside of Napa and Sonoma, the choices are more limited, though it’s worth the search to experience the varying expressions of this versatile grape. Paso Robles is a reliable alternative, with the likes of the San Simeon Estate Reserve 2014 (90, $22), a big and rich red with loamy accents to the dark fruit flavors, and the Maddalena 2014 (88, $18), with red fruit flavors and minerally overtones.

“The most expensive wine in the world is a Merlot [Petrús in Pomerol] and we should have a Merlot that garners that kind of respect,” though not at such a high price, says Jackson Family’s Carpenter. “We have the terroir for it.”

Ambitions still run high in California for Merlot, both on the mountains and in the valleys. And with the best versions generally rich in dark fruit flavors and appealing spice and savory herbal notes, and a bit softer and more open-textured overall than Cabernet, Merlot remains an enticing big red from the Golden State.

Senior editor Kim Marcus is Wine Spectator’s lead taster on California Merlot.

Flora Springs’ Ghost Winery Featured in San Francisco Chronicle

October 30, 2018

Note: The following article was originally written by Chris Macias and published in the San Francisco Chronicle on October 30, 2018 and can be found here.

The Napa Ghost Wineries You Can Visit

Napa Valley Ghost Winery

Trek around Wine Country, near its luxury hotels and fine-dining destinations, and you’ll find the remnants of wineries that date back to a time when Napa wasn’t so flush. These are vestiges of the Dark Ages for California wine. They’re known as ghost wineries, not because they’re haunted (though that’s up for debate in some cases), but because they serve as an important link between Napa’s early years as a wine region and the bustling destination it is now.

Napa Valley had a thriving wine industry in the 19th century, with more than 140 operating wineries opened by the final decade. But starting in the late 1880s, the region was hit with a triple blow that left the local wine industry reeling for decades. First, an outbreak of the lethal grapevine virus phylloxera crippled wine production for 20 years. Then the Great Depression arrived, which dovetailed with Prohibition from 1920 to 1933.

This half-century of setbacks left many California wineries in ruins. Although a few were able to stay in business by selling sacramental wine or grapes for home winemaking, the industry had withered to about three dozen by the time Prohibition was repealed. Many of the buildings remained vacant for decades, falling into ruin. Halloween notwithstanding, Napa’s ghost wineries are worth visiting any time of year. They’re scattered throughout the valley, offering a peek into a storied history and a spirit of perseverance that defines the area.

Here are a handful of the ghosts you can visit:

Flora Springs: This former home of the 1900 Rennie Brothers Winery in St. Helena, suffered a one-two punch at the turn of the 20th century. Not only were its vineyards hit by phylloxera, but a fire in its wine cellar decimated its production capabilities. After decades of inactivity, the property was purchased in the mid 1970s and renamed Flora Springs. The ghost winery has since been renovated and serves as a production facility, which visitors can see during tours of the Flora Springs estate. Flora Springs plays up its ghost winery heritage with Halloween releases including All Hallows’ Eve Cabernet Franc and Ghost Winery Malbec…

Read the full article.


Learn more about our Ghost Winery and our Halloween Wines.

All Hallows’ Eve Cabernet Franc Featured in St. Helena Star

October 23, 2018

Note: The following article was originally written by Catherine Bugue and published in the St. Helena Star on October 16, 2018 and can be found here.

Wine of the week: Flora Springs All Hallows’ Eve 2016 Cabernet Franc Napa Valley

Halloween Wine

It was dark. She was tense. He came at her with a knife.

And as she grabbed the knife away from him, she sighed irritably, and used the corkscrew end to open the wine bottle herself. She was in no mood for his theatrics.

It’s Halloween — it’s time for stories! Why not gather up friends and good wine on the 31st for a night’s respite from the weekly grind? Adding a wine like Flora Spring’s iconic All Hallows’ Eve Cabernet Franc brings good fun to the mix. The 2016 Cabernet Franc label features a spooked black cat and carved pumpkin; the wine has enough rich dark fruits and spice complexity to stand up to the spookiest of ghost stories.

See also special etched bottles like the Drink in Peace Merlot, complete with coffin wine box.


Order by 5 pm October 23 for delivery by Halloween. Please call (800) 913-1118 with questions on shipping times. Shop now.

 

Flora Springs’ Halloween Festivities Featured in Napa Valley Register

October 11, 2018

Note: The following article was originally written by Jess Lander and published in the Napa Valley Register on October 11, 2018 and can be found here.

Creepy visitors, ghostly wines: Flora Springs gets into the spirit of Halloween

Halloween Wines Napa Valley

As a tribute to their 1885 ghost winery, one of the few remaining in the area, Flora Springs Winery goes all out for Halloween.

You can’t miss the trio of enormous skeletons that dance outside their Highway 29 tasting room in St. Helena. Inside, the walls are covered in cobwebs, rooms are transformed into a crematorium and morgue, and you might just find a headless horseman sitting at your table and struggling to sip his wine (for a lack of mouth). But the decorations, done by local design team, The Baker Sisters, are just the beginning. The winery’s Halloween preparation starts months in advance.

Halloween Decorations

Halloween Decor

For eight years running, Flora Springs has released a collection of limited release, Halloween wines. Featuring custom labels and usually 100 percent bottlings of varieties that are traditionally used for blending, the initiative was started by Nat Komes, general manager and son of proprietors John and Carrie Komes. He has a personal fondness for the holiday and even tied the knot on Oct. 31.

Komes’ inspiration for the Halloween collection came from an unlikely place: beer. Once a year, hundreds of thirsty fans spend hours lined up outside Santa Rosa’s Russian River Brewing Company, all for a taste of their cult release, Pliny the Younger.

He wanted his own version of that, saying, “I was trying to generate some of that excitement in the wine business.”

There might not be a line outside of Flora Springs, but there’s certainly a high demand among the winery’s followers. The Halloween wines often sell out well before Halloween each year and have become collectors items in the cellars of many wine club members.

It all started with the Ghost Winery series in 2010. For the labels, Komes partnered with artist Wes Freed, best known for his eerie illustrations on Drive-By Truckers album covers. One of those albums was a favorite of Komes’ brother.

“My brother passed away from cancer right when I was starting the Ghost Winery project,” said Komes. “That’s how I got a hold of Wes Freed, because that was his favorite record at the time. I reached out to him, started telling him about my brother, how he loved the art, and he came right back to me and said, ‘Let’s get going on this.’”

Over the years, the Ghost Winery series evolved into the Halloween collection with a Ghost Winery label at its centerpiece. Always a bottling of malbec —fittingly sourced right in front of Flora Springs’ ghost winery — the label is a modern interpretation of the 1978 label. It features a sketch of the stone ghost winery building, which was severely damaged in a fire in 1900, but has since been restored.

While the Ghost Winery Malbec stays the same every year, the labels of the others change. Komes develops his vision by scouring through children’s books, album covers, comic books and even skateboards, then contacts the respective artist and commissions them to create a one-of-a-kind wine label for that year’s release.

His favorite label of 2018 is the 2016 All Hallows’ Eve Cabernet Franc, a throwback to old school Halloween imagery of a black cat and jack-o-lantern. The art was done by artist Emmenline Forrestal, a former wig maker who illustrated the children’s book “Gloppy,” a favorite of Komes’ daughter’s.

The true collectors item this year is the 2014 Drink In Peace Merlot. On it, a hand-etched, glow-in-the-dark skeleton holds a wine bottle across its chest. It even comes packaged in a coffin box.

And then there’s the 2013 Black Moon Cabernet Sauvignon. Available only in magnums, it’s already sold out and therefore as rare as an actual black moon (defined as an additional new moon that appears in a month or in a season, or the absence of a full moon or of a new moon in a month).

Skateboard artist Dennis McNett’s illustration depicts the phases of the moon surrounded by bats, which Komes said are regulars in the steeple of the ghost winery. The art is etched and hand painted on the bottle.

The new ghost tour
Those who want to taste the Halloween wines can reserve a tasting at The Room, Flora Springs’ St. Helena tasting room, but this year, the winery is taking their celebrations to a new level of creep with a ghost tour. Flora Springs has teamed up with Napa City Ghosts & Legends to lead a paranormal tour of the ghost winery and estate on Sunday, Oct. 28 at 10:30 a.m.

Komes said he was always curious if the ghost winery was haunted and that Napa City Ghosts have since identified three spirits during their recent visits. There’s Matthew, who supposedly died in a horse-related accident, a flapper who loves to party, and another man who gave off a particularly unsettling vibe.

Let’s hope he’s not in the mood for socializing that day.

For more information on Flora Springs’ Halloween tastings and ghost tour, visit www.florasprings.com/events.


Helpful Links:
Visit The Room | Visit The Estate
Ghost Winery Tasting at The Room
Paranormal Ghost Winery Tour at The Estate
Our Ghost Winery History
Halloween Wines
Ghost Winery Malbec
2014 Drink In Peace Merlot
2013 Black Moon Cabernet Sauvignon

Flora Springs’ Paranormal Ghost Winery Tour Featured in Wine Spectator

September 27, 2018

Note: The following article was originally published in the Wine Spectator on September 27, 2018 and can be found here.

Paranormal Activity at ‘Ghost Winery’

Ghost Winery Halloween Napa Valley
“…But if you missed the chance to commune with Napa’s dead last weekend at the St. Helena Cemetery, fear not: There are plenty more spectral vintners doomed to roam the terroir for all time (it’s been said some Napa winemakers even sold their souls), and not a few so-called “ghost wineries” they’re thought to haunt. The old Rennie Brothers Winery, completed in 1900, is one—the once-thriving wine factory sat derelict through Prohibition before its rebirth as Flora Spring Estate. On Oct. 28, the winery is bringing in local paranormal investigators/Napa history fiends Ellen MacFarlane and Devin Sisk, who most recently appeared together on the Travel Channel’s Ghost Adventures, to lead a haunted tour and wine lunch in the old stone cellars and caves. “As one of the few remaining Napa Valley ‘ghost wineries,’ we are constantly reminded that there are phantoms and spirits who walked here before us,” noted general manager Nat Komes to Unfiltered.

As in past years, Flora Springs is also releasing a set of Halloween-themed wines…with limited-edition label art from painters and illustrators: All Hallow’s Eve Cabernet Franc, Ghost Winery Malbec, Black Moon Cabernet Sauvignon and Drink in Peace Merlot (glow-in-the-dark label; comes in coffin-shaped gift box) are a few representative treats.”


Helpful Links:
Book your Paranormal Ghost Winery Tour at The Estate – October 28, 2018, only 30 spots available
Check out our Halloween Wines
Learn more about our Ghost Winery history

Flora Springs Featured in Capital Press

August 10, 2018

Note: The following article was originally written by Julia Hollister and published in the Capital Press on July 22, 2018 and can be found here.

Western Innovator: Vineyard, winery work in progress
John Komes constantly experiments with new techniques at Flora Springs Vineyards and Winery.

John Komes and Nat Komes of Flora Springs Winery in Napa Valley
Flora Springs Winery John Komes and his son, Nat, sort grapes at Flora Springs Winery in the Napa Valley of California.

NAPA VALLEY, Calif. — John Komes can tell you a lot about viticulture and the changes he’s witnessed; he’s been at it for 41 years.

“My ‘first’ career was as a contractor, and I worked on construction projects all over the Bay Area,” he said. “But in the early 1970s I took a wine appreciation course and my fascination with wine just took off. When my parents bought the Flora Springs property in 1977, I convinced them to let me start making wine from the vines there.

“Part of my motivation was that I wanted to move my family to Napa Valley. It was so unspoiled, so bucolic, and it seemed like a good place to raise children. And I loved the idea of having the whole family involved in the winery. Today I work closely with my son, my brother-in-law and my nephew, which is very satisfying.”

Komes said there have been many changes in viticulture since he got started, and he’s learned much over the years. At Flora Springs he is constantly experimenting, both in the vineyard and the winery. They were one of the first wineries to try barrel fermentation with Chardonnay.

“Our flagship wine, Trilogy, which we introduced in 1984, was one of Napa Valley’s the first proprietary red Bordeaux-style blends,” he said.

“Because we’ve owned our vineyards for so long we’ve had several opportunities to replant, and every time we do, we experiment with different spacing, rootstocks, clones, trellis systems, you name it,” he said. “It’s all about fine tuning as you go along, and I can tell you that the wines we make today are more compelling than ever because of the experimenting we’ve done over the years.”

Napa Valley is a superb place to grow grapes, but over time Komes admits he has learned a lot about which varieties grow best here. This is a region where Cabernet Sauvignon thrives, and the Sauvignon Blanc also grows well.

“I guess to answer the question, the hardest grapes to grow are the varieties that are planted in the wrong place,” he said.

The family has 500 acres throughout the Napa Valley, 300 of which are planted to vineyard.

“We have estate properties in Carneros, Oakville, Rutherford and St. Helena, and we produce varietal wines ranging from Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay to Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and other red Bordeaux varietals,” he said. “All of our vineyards are sustainably farmed, and many are farmed organically.”

Wine tastes are changing, and Komes sees more people gravitating to reds these days, but that’s not to say there aren’t a lot of white wine lovers out there.

“In fact, we happened to notice recently that there is no white wine emoji, just a red one! So Flora Springs launched a ‘Where’s the #WhiteWineEmoji’ campaign, and we’re inviting people to sign a petition to have one created,” Komes said. “People can go our website at www.florasprings.com to learn more.”

In spite of the excellent weather and high-quality grapes, Komes said two challenges stand out.

“The two that stand out to me are climate change and labor,” he said. “But the wine industry has faced a lot of challenges, and when we work together we usually find solutions.”

One more thing: What about the big wineries in Napa?

“People often ask me if I think there are too many wineries in Napa Valley. I don’t think there are too many wineries; I just think there are too many big wineries,” he said. “In the last couple of decades the wine industry has experienced what many American industries have undergone: conglomeration. A few big guys buying up the little guys.

“But the little guy is the genius of this industry. The one who discovers new techniques in the vineyards and wineries, who finds and develops small plots of land that produce outstanding grapes, who innovates and creates. I like to think we still have that spirit at Flora Springs, and I certainly think it shows in our wines and hospitality. I also think there will always be little guys, people willing to risk everything to pursue their life’s passion. And to them, I raise my glass!”

John Komes

Residence: Napa Valley

Occupation: Founder, president and proprietor of Flora Springs Vineyards and Winery

Years in Business: 41

Family: Married to Carrie Komes. Son is Nat Komes. Sister and brother-in-law are Julie Komes Garvey and Pat Garvey.

First to Call for the White Wine Emoji

July 31, 2018

Today we raise a glass to you. For those of you that are part of our digital community that emailed, signed, tweeted, messaged, liked or shared our plea for a white wine emoji, we are so grateful. If you proudly wear our white wine emoji button, if you always comment, tag, and like our content then we owe you our gratitude. Our efforts are paying off, as the campaign we launched last year calling for a new wine emoji is gaining traction and has been embraced by the global wine community, including several large wineries in California.

It’s not everyday we are featured in major publications such as: Forbes, Today, Decanter, and Wine Spectator. So you can imagine the happy dance we were doing in the cellar today, when we were given credit as the first winery to launch a campaign around the white wine emoji!

Flora Springs White Wine Emoji

“It’s gratifying to see other wine companies follow our example of making wine fun and relevant with their own petitions and campaigns to establish a White Wine Emoji,” said Nat Komes, General Manager of Flora Springs. “The Unicode Emoji Subcommittee encouraged us to work as a global community on the project, and these additional efforts of wine companies and of course white wine lovers around the world will help us reach the goal Flora Springs sought when we started this movement.”

Flora Springs White Wines

 

It’s because of our dedicated community on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Pinterest that we feel so passionate about the white wine emoji. People from all over the world post messages to us, and we always have to respond with the red wine version of the wine glass emoji, even if we know they are in our white wine only wine club! As a family that has led the way in white wine since our founding over 40 years ago, we’re proud you trust us with this initiative.

White Wine Emoji

Join us in celebrating each and every white wine by calling for the establishment of a White Wine Emoji, by using hashtag #WhiteWineEmoji and tag us @florasprings. Make your voice heard and sign the #WhiteWineEmoji petition now. Learn more about our White Wine Emoji campaign.

Four 93s – and More – for Trilogy

July 18, 2018

Trilogy Wine Awards Accolades Reviews

 

Since the founding of Flora Springs Winery in 1978, it’s been our family’s goal is to over-deliver on every aspect of our business, particularly when it comes to the quality and consistency of our wines.

It means the world to us when our customers recognize these efforts by celebrating life’s big moments, and simple daily joys, with our wines.

With every delighted Wine Club Member and every customer compliment, we know we are still on the right path.

It’s also rewarding when the wine writers, reviewers, and bloggers notice our wines. And they sure are noticing the 2015 vintage of Trilogy – with four fabulous 93 point awards from top publications. While we’ll always believe that everyone should decide on their own whether they like a wine or not, great scores, awards, and reviews are always appreciated – thank you.


93 points, The Wine Advocate
“A blend of 82% Cabernet Sauvignon, 10% Malbec and 8% Petit Verdot, the deep garnet-purple 2015 Cabernet Sauvignon Trilogy offers up aromas of cassis, blackberries and black cherries with hints of vanilla, chocolate and baking spices. Full-bodied, concentrated, expressive and open for business, it’s spicy and velvety in the mouth with a long finish.”
—Lisa Perrotti-Brown MW, October 2017


93 points, James Suckling
“Hot stones, oyster shell, ripe stems, pressed violets and nutmeg. Full-bodied with round, ripe tannins that are structured and dense, fine acidity and a fruit-forward finish. A blend of 82% cabernet sauvignon, 10% malbec and 8% petit verdot. Drink in 2020.”
—James Sucking, December 2017


93 points, Blue Lifestyle
“Lush and rich with smooth texture and lush plum and berry fruit; dense and rich, deep and showing promise for aging.”
—Anthony Dias Blue, January 2018


93 points, The Tasting Panel Magazine, April 2018


91 points & Best of Class, California State Fair, April 2018


90 points, Wine Enthusiast, April 2018


90 points, San Diego International Wine & Spirits Challenge, April 2018


90 points, Connoisseurs’ Guide to California Wine
“On the basis of its ripe and fairly juicy, oak-sweetened aromas, it is easy enough to anticipate that this one will be rounded, ready-to-drink wine, but, if its initially up-front flavors are in fact fruity and very inviting in a way that distantly recalls good Merlot, it is all Cabernet Sauvignon in terms of its youthful tannins and obvious tactile grip. It is not ominously astringent, but it is firmly built and will take some time to make good on the promise of polish at which it now hints, and, while it warrants no less than three or four years of patience, we see it evolving favorably for seven to ten.” April 2018


90 points, International Wine Report
“The 2015 Trilogy is an immense, ultra-modern Napa Valley red, composed of 82% Cabernet Sauvignon, 10% Malbec and 8% Petite Verdot which spent 18 months in 85% French oak and 15% American oak. It opens to profound aromatics of blackberry cobbler, crème de cassis, mocha, sweet spices, vanilla, sweet toasted oak and a touch of dusty notes all taking shape. Full-bodied, layered and intense on the palate, with profound depth and concentration. Ripe dark fruits and mocha flavors continue to resonate from its core, as it leads up to the long, mouth coating finish. Overall, this is a massive red, which should have at least a decade of evolution ahead…” Read more.
—J. D’Angelo, June 2018


Suggestions for rack restocking
The Tennessean
“Trilogy Red Wine, 2015, from Flora Springs was one of Napa’s first Bordeaux-style red blends—now it’s a classic. Trilogy is like purple in the glass (even the winemaker calls it decadent).”
—Steve Prati, May 30, 2018


25 Wines to Drink Now or Lay Down for the Future
The Daily Meal
“You always want to have a few bottles of wine on hand that you can drink whenever the occasion arises, whether for tonight’s dinner, when friends drop by, or for an impromptu party. On the other hand, it’s also nice to have a few bottles put away to drink in future years on special occasions…

A rich and delicious blend of mainly cabernet sauvignon with a little malbec and petit verdot, offering velvety flavors of blackberry and mulberry and a light oak accent.” Read more.
—Roger Morris, March 21, 2018


Samples that Inspire a Rallying Cry Moment
DallasWineChick.com
“This was an unctuous wine that was packed with fruit – blackberry, cassis, black cherry, plum, chocolate, mocha, cedar and vanilla. It was nuanced and had depth. I kept discovering new flavors as we sipped. It was absolutely delicious.” Read more. March 18, 2018


Use of oak affects fruit character of cabernet sauvignon
Capital Gazette
“Flora Springs was a pioneer in making a Bordeaux blend — its first was in 1984. It’s no surprise, then, that experience and good fruit sources makes them a leader in hedonistic blends. Extracted dark fruit flavors with hints of pepper, chocolate and vanilla. Round tannins suggest good things to come.” Read more.
—Tom Marquardt and Patrick Darr, February 21, 2018


There is 3x decadence in ‘Trilogy’
JuliatheWineExaminer.com
“Flora Springs has created a red Bordeaux blend that celebrates the incredible fusion of three varietals that define elegance. Your time swirling and sipping this incredible selection is long past due. This is bliss in a bottle…Open this seductive wine about 20 minutes before serving to allow aromas of Bing cherries, sweet cassis and blackberry to start the show. Then swirl and sip dark licorice, cola and cardamom flavors that explode on the palate and exit in a long, luxurious finish. Pour this “big” wine with “big” foods such as prime rib, bold burgers and meat laden pastas. Winemakers say this enticing, robust red wine can be enjoyed through the next decade; but why wait?” Read more. January 18, 2018


91+ points, Millennial Drinkers
“Deep and dark purplish ruby red. Layered nose with notes of vanilla bean, anise, cinnamon, cassis, blackberries and more baking spices. A little dark cocoa with some air. Medium plus tannins (6.5/10) and full body potential. A little spicy on the palate with lots of red and black fruits. Notes of cinnamon and sweet spices too. Long and lingering finish. Still just a baby that will improve with a few months, even years in the bottle. Drink Dates: 2018 till 2030.” Read more. January 25, 2018


Rated: A, Drinkhacker
“This year’s Trilogy is a blend of 82% Cabernet Sauvignon, 10% Malbec, and 8% Petit Verdot. For 2015, Trilogy cuts a soulful, silky, and seductive profile, bursting at the seams with fruit both fresh and dried — plump currants, fresh plums, and dense blackberry notes. The fruit is so powerful the wine comes across as slightly sweet at times, and it cuts easily through any sense of tannin that might otherwise cling to the palate. As the finish evolves, bramble notes emerge alongside some gentle leather and tobacco, with an herbal, clove-heavy note percolating on the finish. Lots going on here, but at the same time, the wine is so easy to drink that it is, at times, hard to put down.” Read more. January 31, 2018


2015 Trilogy Review
Wine Weirdos, featuring Allison Levine of Please the Palate and the Napa Valley Register:


Learn more about the 2015 Trilogy.

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